street dogs

20140217-191138.jpgFrom street art to street dogs, that’s how far this challenge has taken me so far.

Don’t worry, I doubt you’ll see “street people” make it on to the list, or even “street food” for that matter, but don’t get me started on THAT subject!

There are street dogs all over Santiago, and the rest of Chile for that matter. It’s obviously not good that the situation exists, a result of poor pet ownership, abandonment, and a lack of desexing, among other things. Still, I think it’s preferable to see these dogs living on the street, where they at least have a life and a possibility to be adopted, fed or cared for. In Australia, the situation is “sterilized”, removed from our sensitive view, with hundreds of thousands of dogs needlessly put down each year while people go on living their merry lives, happily oblivious to the problem.

Here, the problem is under your nose and many a kind hearted samaritan will take a lucky street dog (or more) into their home. I heard a story from a Chilean friend just today about how he took a street dog into his home who has now assimilated with his other two dogs and is very much a happy, well-adjusted, and very grateful and loving, member of the family.

It’s probably just as well I live in an apartment, otherwise I may have a small collection by now!

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The street dogs themselves are generally harmless, and happy to go about their lives without too much bother. They sleep wherever they want, whenever they want, and people seem to move around them without giving it a second thought.  I have often had to double-check to make sure a dog is sleeping and not, well, the unmentionable other alternative.

Stay still too long though, and somebody just may put a price tag on you at the flea market!  (In fun, of course)

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They are often looked after by the general public, with food and water bowls randomly left around, and even kennels left in Parque Forestal for them.  In winter, I’ve even seen street dogs wearing little furry coats that someone has bought for them.  People buy them “sopapillas” from street vendors, and generally the markets and the rubbish bins are popular feeding spots for them.

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Give one a friendly sideways glance at the traffic light and you may find yourself with a new best friend, trotting along beside you for a few blocks, until they get distracted by a potential food source or another dog.

They are often at San Cristobal in the mornings, happy to find company (dog or human) and take their morning exercise climbing the hill.  Last weekend, a lovely black mutt followed me up the hill, unfortunately after being kicked at by a less-friendly human who didn’t want her walking within two feet of her.

20140217-191239.jpgThis beautiful girl “adopted” us during a picnic in the park recently, patiently and peacefully waiting with big pleading eyes, knowing that she would receive a payoff of leftover scraps at the end of our meal. (She didn’t like the camera flash though!)

I know that there are a lot of people who have, or have had, problems with street dogs, like incessant barking at night or, worse, attacks or bites. I know there is a LOT that can be done to improve the situation, starting with education around responsible pet ownership and desexing.

I also know that there are many times when the antics, or just the presence, of a street dog has brought a smile to my face, and that’s why they make my list of things that I love about living in Chile.

Want to see more of Chile’s street dogs?  Check out this fantastic video, an initiative by two Chilean college students to raise awareness to their plight.

And, or course, if you have room in your home and heart to responsibly take in a dog, go ahead, it could change your life.

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La Vega

It’s no secret that La Vega is my favourite place to shop in Santiago, so it’s no surprise that it was going to turn up on this list of things that I love about living in Chile.

20140217-164328.jpgLa Vega was literally my first outing in Santiago when I arrived this time around, now over a year ago, and I continue to frequent the market on a regular basis.  The people, who originally beheld me with a level of curiosity, are now a little more open and talkative.  I have my regulars from whom I buy certain things, and others that I’m drawn to based on the produce on hand.  In addition to fruit and vegetables, I have my favourite “egg man”, and there’s even a stall where I find some pretty decent muesli (granola) that’s not overly processed or sweetened.

20140217-164405.jpgThere’s a couple of good “deli’s” too, and Quesos Arturito seems to be a favourite with both locals and foreigners in the know, stocking a wide range of produce at a fraction of the price of the popular supermarkets.  I’ve been know to buy the exact same brand of cheese in La Vega for one-third of the price on the major supermarkets.

I love watching the seasons change through La Vega and, although you can get a lot of products all year round, you can tell by the price and quality what’s really in season and at it’s best.

In addition to the previously mentioned berries, melons are in abundance right now and are so cheap, and make a good, refreshing juice is you overstock, and there’s lots of great corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchinis, etc.

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Although some days I don’t feel like facing the hike to La Vega, I am always glad I did it, and I don’t think I will ever get sick of the colours, variety and faces of La Vega.

Clearly, one of the things I love about living in Chile.

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The Andes

20140216-182224.jpgWhether you’re looking at them, drinking wine at the foot of them, flying over them, skiing on them, riding horses on them, or trekking in them (yeah, right!), there is no denying that The Andes are one of Chile’s most beautiful and majestic features.

For someone that comes from a relatively flat country, I am still often blown away by the sight of them.

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They are particularly beautiful in winter, when they are snow-capped and catch the most amazing light of the sunset.  But even in the heat of summer, it amazes me that there is still snow up there.

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I can be walking down a city street, and suddenly catch a glimpse between tall buildings, or running through the park, and glance up and see the glacial tops. We even had some fresh snowfall yesterday, along with some very unexpected February rain in the city.

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They are truly amazing, completely different to anything in my home country, and one of the things I love about living in Chile.

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Eric Kayser

20140215-222747.jpgEric Kayser is obviously not Chilean.

It’s a French chain of artisan bakeries, proudly boasting international locations in Seoul, Tokyo, Kiev, New York – just to name a few.

In mid-2013, they added Santiago to their list, providing a delicious range of artisan breads, and amazing cakes and pastries, that only the French could have created.

Of course, Chileans have, and LOVE their bread, and are reported to be the world’s second biggest consumer of bread per capita, behind first-placed Germany.  I first heard this straight from a Chilean’s bread-filled mouth, but I fact-checked it and immediately found a rather reputable-looking source in the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service that supports the claim.

20140215-222637.jpgProbably the most famous of Chilean bread is the marraqueta, and Chileans are fiercely proud and protective of it.  It’s a little white bun that is folded and baked so that it comes out as four-pieces-in-one, ready to be easily snapped apart and gobbled up.  When it’s done well, it’s crunchy on the outside and fluffy in the middle, and is perfect for “choripan”, a popular “entrée” at Chilean barbecues consisting of “loganiza” (a fat juicy sausage) and “pebre”, a spiced salsa of tomatoes, onions and a little “aji” chilli.  It’s delicious, and fills the void while you’re waiting for the large quantity of meat to cook.

But I digress.  My point is, for me, the marraqueta is perfect for just such an occasion, but I was SO happy to discover Eric Kayser when they opened, and be provided with a variety of taste and texture.

20140215-222627.jpgI’m a particular fan of their Tourte de Meule, an airy-centred bread with a deliciously chewy crust.  Yum!  OK, so it’s not cheap at CLP $5.000 a loaf ($10), but they let you buy a half-loaf and will slice it to whatever thickness you want.

They also have a range of prepared lunches, including baguettes and sandwiches filled with quality fillings, quiches and croque monsieur, fresh salads, and yummy desserts.  If you’re eating in, they even make a reasonable coffee which comes accompanied with a mini financier or meringue.

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Their Santiago bakery is quite close to Plaza Peru, which is the perfect spot to enjoy a take-away baguette with jamon serrano, lettuce and cheese, and maybe a scrumptious tarte au citron if you’re treating yourself.

So, just when I was really starting to miss the delicious bread options back home, like the Rye and Sunflower from my local, Alison’s Handmade Bread, along came Eric Kayser, and firmly planted themselves on my list of things that I love about living in Chile.

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wineries!

20140214-180853.jpgWineries!  La la la, sing a happy song!

Well, here I am, halfway through my challenge to write, every day during the month of February, about something that I love about living in Chile.

Who would have thought that I would wait SO long to write about wineries?  Well, I did say that my posts would be in no particular order, but it seems quite appropriate to use the halfway milestone AND Valentine’s Day to write about one of the things that I love the most.

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I’ve written about wineries in Chile before, and the fact that they are one of the big reasons that I decided to stay here.  You really can’t go very far outside of Santiago and you’ll hit a wine region but, go even further, and you hit even more wine regions.

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So far, I’ve visited many of the major valleys, such as Elqui, Casablanca, San Antonio, Maipo, Rapel, Colchagua, Curico, Maule; and have many more to explore.  I have a trip planned to Cachapoal in a week, and after that, the next on my hit list is Aconcagua because I’ve tried some very nice wines from Errazuriz and Von Siebenthal.

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Not only are the wineries great because of the wine, although that’s obviously a BIG drawcard.  The Chilean scenery is amazing, the wineries themselves are unique and beautiful, the people are lovely, and it’s sometimes just nice to get out of the city and explore.

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It’s even better to share the experience with other people and enjoy it together, which is what led me to start my new project, “Chile Wine Trails“.

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So today, a day centred around love, I am using the occasion to pay homage to one of the things I love most about living in Chile – it’s beautiful wineries!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

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